General

Cerner CoPath Analyst

Posted by Samantha Serfass on June 11, 2019 in General

Cerner CoPath Analyst

Pittsburgh, PA

Since 2010, Excite Health Partners has been a growing leader in the Healthcare consulting and staffing industry. We are committed to the development of the HIT industry, which is why we ensure our employees are educated, prepared and confident. We understand our employees are the backbone of our company, so we work to find the best fit position for each of our unique professionals.

Qualifications

At Excite, we want you to succeed. We want to help you reach your goals and find a satisfying and challenging work environment. For the Cerner CoPath Analyst position, you should meet the following criteria:

Joining the Team

Excite understands that employees are the cornerstone to our success. We are proud to offer the following benefits:

  • Competitive compensation
  • Health, Vision, Dental plan
  • Life and long-term disability
  • 401k plan with designated company match
  • Weekly pay

Breaking Down Denials: CC/MCC Denials

Posted by Samantha Serfass on March 19, 2019 in Blog, General, News

BREAKING DOWN DENIALS: CC/MCC DENIALS 

When someone in the healthcare industry hears the word “denial”, many things can come to mind.  There are many different types and kinds of denials; what could be said about denials could fill a book. To narrow the conversation, let’s touch on one specific type of denial that has become more prevalent for hospitals in recent years. 

A documented and coded diagnosis acting as a CC or MCC for the DRG is denied by the payer with the claim that the clinical picture does not support that it is a true and valid diagnosis.  By removing the diagnosis code, the DRG is reduced, resulting in a reduced payment to the hospital.

This type of denial has been called various things which can create confusion when assigning the appropriate person to address it.

A few examples are:

  • “clinical denials” which could also mean denial of admission to an inpatient bed stating the patient’s clinical picture does not warrant inpatient care
  • “DRG denials” which could also mean the entire admission was denied, not just a denied diagnosis changing the DRG
  • “Coding denials” which tends to sound like this is a coder issue when in fact it is not a coding issue at all

Payers have learned how to target the types of inpatient discharges that lend well to this type of challenge.  Common targets include DRGs with a single CC or MCC where the CC or MCC is acute renal failure/injury, acute respiratory failure, encephalopathy, malnutrition, or sepsis.

If this is not a coding specific issue, then where does the problem lie?  The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has not stated any one criterion as the official clinical criteria for all to follow.  As a result, many payers including the RACs have created their own criteria or adapted existing criteria in the industry such as AKIN (Acute Kidney Injury Network), RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, and End-stage kidney disease), or KDIGO (The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes).  Providers most often do not know what individual payer criteria is being used.  Physicians have not been educated on when additional documentation is needed to support certain conditions that they diagnose and document. 

The coding teams are stuck in the middle.   Facilities can trend what different payers are targeting and the basis of their denials.  Armed with this information, coders still cannot diagnose the patient.  Even with outlined criteria to follow, conditions documented in the record and not ruled out cannot be ignored by the coder.  The coder cannot make the determination that a documented diagnosis is not valid and choose not to code it. 

What’s a hospital to do?  Hospitals should create a team to review these types of denials and fight back whenever possible.  Some hospitals have taken the extra steps to create internal clinical guidelines to give direction and promote consistency; however, payers may still deny diagnoses based on their own criteria.  Offer as much education on the issue as possible to physicians, CDI staff, and coders.

Who should review and argue the cases? The best person to review these denials and write up an appeal letter would be the very person that documented the diagnosis in question, the physician.  However, it is a rare hospital that has a medical staff member with the time and willingness to do so.  So, the task should fall to someone with strong writing skills with a clinical background that can create a strong argument in support of a documented diagnosis by outlining the patient’s clinical picture in detail.

From a different angle: Coding was initially created for the primary purpose of statistics and research.  Coded data can play a key role in value-based care and other programs based on patient care outcomes and quality of care indicators.  While Official Coding Guidelines offer clear direction on when to assign a secondary diagnosis code, the guidelines could be a part of the problem.  The guidelines state additional conditions are coded when they affect patient care by requiring clinical evaluation, therapeutic treatment, diagnostic procedures, they extended the length of stay, or necessitate increased nursing care and/or monitoring.  But what the guidelines neglect to include are conditions that create a patient health risk for the future.

One example includes patients with morbid obesity that decline nutritional counseling or any other type of intervention.  Because the condition is not being addressed, some payers are denying it as a secondary code/s.  As patients develop obesity related conditions in the future, there will be limited data for research of obesity related health problems because the condition of obesity is not being coded now.  This also could create a problem with quality of care analysis when patients’ conditions are uncontrolled due to unaddressed obesity such as diabetes, respiratory conditions, joint problems, and cardiac disease.

 Every denial should be reviewed and where possible and appropriate, challenged.  Payers may tend to target facilities that do not argue or fight back.  Do not accept a payer’s denial at face value.  Review the case.  If there is enough clinical support in the record to argue, do so.  The continued challenge is what constitutes “enough clinical support”?  Not even CMS answers that for us.

Lisa Marks

VP of HIM Services

FLU SEASON’S HERE: CODING RESPIRATORY INFLUENZA

Posted by Samantha Serfass on February 19, 2019 in Blog, General, News

FLU SEASON’S HERE – Coding Respiratory Influenza

Every year, influenza season is considered to stretch from October through May.  The peak occurs between December through February, causing a lot of hospital encounters— whether as inpatients, emergency department visits, or physician office visits.

Within the medical world, there are different types of influenza viruses.  In order to reflect the type of influenza appropriately, the coding professional must carefully examine the documentation provided by the physician in order to assign the correct influenza code.  Within this article, we will discuss the different types of influenza and the documentation/coding nuances for each.

Sometimes the type of influenza will not be identified, but the physician will still document “influenza” and treat it as such.  Within the alphabetical index, this would be considered an unidentified influenza virus (J11.x).  Other times, the physician will order a nasal swab and it will come back positive for Influenza A or Influenza B.  In these cases, the influenza would be indexed as Influenza, identified influenza virus, NEC (J10.x).

Novel A Influenza virus is considered to be an influenza arising from animal origin, and is actually somewhat rare.  Some of the key words the physician must document in order to assign a code for Novel A are: “novel”, “avian”, “swine”, “H1N1”, “H5N1”.  The inclusive list of sub terms can be found within the alphabetical index and are also listed in the tabular index under J09. X.  These codes can only be assigned on confirmed cases of Novel Influenza because these are nationally reported infectious diseases.  If the physician uses equivocal terms such as “possible” or “probable” a code from the J09 section should not be assigned and the physician should be queried for clarification.

There are times when the coder will see documentation of “influenza like illness”.  In the alphabetical index, there is a specific entry for this, which directs the coder back to the main term of influenza.  Because there is a specific alphabetical index entry, this diagnosis is appropriate for assignment on both inpatient and outpatient cases.

Under all specified influenza types, there is a subset of manifestations defined by the word “with”.  Referring back to the Official Coding Guidelines for ICD-10-CM and PCS, the diagnoses listed under the term “with” are assumed to be linked and can be coded as such (i.e., influenza with pneumonia).

It’s important to remember chart documentation is critical when assigning the appropriate code for influenza.  The coder should carefully review the alphabetical index entries and assign the most appropriate code.  Remember that Novel A Influenza and Influenza A are not the same.  Influenza A is most common, whereas Novel A Influenza is rather rare.

Robyn McCoart

Director of Client Services, Excite Health Partners

Senior Project Manager- Shaker Heights, OH

Posted by Samantha Serfass on January 7, 2019 in Additional Vendors, General, Job

Senior Project Manager – Shaker Heights, OH

Since 2010, Excite Health Partners has been a growing leader in the Healthcare consulting and staffing industry. We are committed to the development of the HIT industry, which is why we ensure our employees are educated, prepared and confident. We understand our employees are the backbone of our company, so we work to find the best fit position for each of our unique professionals.

Qualifications

At Excite, we want you to succeed. We want to help you reach your goals and find a satisfying and challenging work environment. For the Senior Project Manager position, you should meet the following criteria:

  • At least 7 years of project management experienced, required
  • Project Management Professional (PMP), preferred
  • Build and implement Lean process workflows – project & portfolio management
  • Identify and resolve issues and conflicts within various project teams
  • Assist department talent management: talent selection, conduct performance reviews, maintain team dynamics
  • Strong communication, organizational and leadership skills
  • Bachelor’s degree or related field experience

Joining the Team

Excite understands that employees are the cornerstone to our success. We are proud to offer the following benefits:

  • Competitive compensation
  • Health, Vision, Dental plan
  • Life and long-term disability
  • 401k plan with designated company match
  • Weekly pay

IP/OPS Coder – Remote

Posted by Samantha Serfass on November 6, 2018 in General

Remote IP/OPS Coder

Remote

Since 2010, Excite Health Partners has been a growing leader in the Healthcare consulting and staffing industry. We are committed to the development of the HIM industry, which is why we ensure our employees are educated, prepared and confident. We understand our employees are the backbone of our company, so we work to find the best fit position for each of our unique professionals.

Qualifications

At Excite, we value your unique background and want to be sure your experience matches the job. For the Remote IP/OPS Coder position, you should meet the following criteria:

  • Must have at least 3 years working with Epic, 3M 360
  • Must have 3-5 years’ experience in IP-DRG coding
  • Must have 1-2 years’ experience in SDS and OBS coding
  • Level 1 trauma experience preferred, but not required
  • Must be AHIMA (RHIA, RHIT, CCS) certification

Joining the Team

Excite understands that employees are the cornerstone to our success. We are proud to offer the following benefits:

  • Competitive compensation
  • Health, Vision, Dental plan
  • Life and long-term disability
  • 401k plan with designated company match
  • Weekly pay
  • Direct deposit

TBI: Coding Traumatic Brain Injuries

Posted by Samantha Serfass on August 21, 2018 in Blog, General

TBI: Coding Traumatic Brain Injuries

The correct coding of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) can cause confusion… no pun intended. The coder needs to understand not only the definition of a Traumatic Brain Injury, but also must recognize the difference between coding a Personal History of TBI and reporting a residual condition or sequela, that is a result of a TBI.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines TBI as a disruption in the normal function of the brain that can be caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head, or penetrating head injury.  Severity may range from mild to severe. Disabilities resulting from a TBI depend upon the severity of the injury, the location of the injury, and the age and general health of the individual.   All TBI’s are serious injuries, as they are brain injuries.  Oftentimes, the brain can be left with areas that are irreversibly damaged. Each year, TBI’s contribute to a substantial number of deaths and cases of permanent disability. There are various types of residual effects that a person can exhibit after the acute phase of the injury has ended.

In ICD-10-CM the term “Late Effect” has been replaced with “Sequela”. A sequela is the residual effect after the acute phase of an illness or injury has ended.  There is no time limit for use of a sequela code. The code for the acute phase of the illness or injury that led to the sequela is never reported with a code for the sequela.

Coding of Sequela requires 2 codes:

The nature of the sequela is sequenced first, with the sequela codes sequenced second.

Additional guidelines for reporting sequela of injuries:

The code that describes the sequela is reported 1st, followed by the code for the specific injury with a 7th character “S”, to identify the condition as a sequela of the injury.  The “S” is added only to the injury code.

 

Example:

Patient experienced a fall down steps, with loss of consciousness, resulting in a traumatic subdural hemorrhage. Physician documents injury occurred 3 years ago.. There are no apparent sequela, late effect, or residual conditions.

Assign code:  Z87.20   Personal History of Traumatic Brain Injury

 

Same patient, but documentation supports patient has a mild cognitive impairment as a result of the previous TBI.

Assign Codes:  G31.84  Mild Cognitive Impairment, so stated

                           S06.5X9S  Traumatic Subdural Hemorrhage with Loss of Consciousness of Unspecified Duration, Sequela.

 

Please note:

“Codes from categories Z85 through Z92 are used to indicate a personal history of a previous condition. When the condition mentioned is still present or still under treatment, or if a complication is present, a code from the series Z85 through Z92 is not assigned.”

Reference:

Format and Conventions and Current Coding Practices for ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS

Z Codes & External Cause of Morbidity Codes/Codes Representing Patient History, Status, or Problems

Software Spotlight: McKesson

Posted by Samantha Serfass on January 5, 2018 in Blog, General

 Spotlight on McKesson

August Software Spotlight: McKesson

McKesson

McKesson Corporation is a healthcare information technology, medical-surgical supplies and pharmaceutical distributor. As a healthcare information technology distributor, McKesson provides numerous healthcare entities with electronic medical records, data analyses, and facility management software.  The company was founded in 1833 by John McKesson and Charles Olcott and was originally called Olcott & McKesson.  Olcott & Mckesson was originally based in New York and created to sell imported chemicals and therapeutic drugs.

Now, McKesson is headquartered in San Francisco and employees over 76,000 people. They are the largest healthcare services corporation in the nation with more than $179 billion in annual revenue.  The corporation, which is ran by CEO John Hammergren, has one of the highest annual sales in the United States.  McKesson bases their business practice around shared values.  According to www.mckesson.com, “McKesson is in business for better health. As a company working with health care stakeholders in every setting, we are charting the course toward a stronger, more sustainable future for the entire industry.”

5 interesting facts about McKesson:

  1. McKesson is the oldest healthcare services corporation in the United States.

 

  1. In 2015, McKesson was ranked 11 on Fortune 500

 

  1. 50% of hospitals in the United States, 20% of physicians and 100% of health plans are served by McKesson

 

  1. According to McKesson.com, they are number 1 in medical-management software and services to payers.

 

  1. McKesson is one of seven founding members of CommonWell Health Alliance. Which, according to commonwellalliance.org, is an organization that is “creating and executing a vendor-neutral platform that breaks down the technological and process barriers that currently inhibit effective health data exchange.”

 

What is Epic? A Quick Overview of Modalities

Posted by Ashley McCool on November 9, 2017 in Blog, General, News

About Epic

Epic is an electronic health record system (EHR) and company that develops software to help people get well, stay well, and help future generations be healthier. Known as one of the leading EHR vendors in the US, Epic has over 190 million patients with a current electronic record in the system.

About the Company

In 1979, Judy Faulkner, founder and CEO, launched Epic Systems Corporation from her basement with a $70,000 bank loan secured against her home and the equity of a few loyal programming customers. The privately held software company is based in Verona, Wisconsin and has a nearly 1.8 billion revenue. Originally named Human Services Computing but rebranded as Epic Systems in 1983, the company currently has over 9,000 employees.

The headquarters is known for its imaginative campus; each section of the campus has a different theme, ranging from farming to castles to New York City’s Grand Central Station. The campus also features a treehouse for meetings. Not only does the Epic campus boast a unique design, they are also proud of their sustainability efforts, which include six wind turbines and 18 acres of solar panels, and utilizes underground geothermal pipes for heating and cooling the campus buildings.

About the Software

The purpose of Epic is to give patients the tools to lead a healthier life. With MyChart, patients have access to personal and family health information. They can message their doctors, attend e-visits, complete questionnaires, schedule appointments, and have more involvement in managing their health when and where it’s most convenience for them. While in the hospital, patients can stay in touch with their care team by using the MyChart tablet, which also can be used to personalize educational materials.

 

Epic’s software is most commonly used in:

  • Community hospitals
  • Academic medical centers
  • Children’s organizations
  • Retail clinics (such as CVS Health)
  • Multi-specialty groups
  • Integrated delivery networks
  • Rehab centers
  • Skilled nursing facilities
  • Hospice care facilities
  • Independent practices
  • Patient homes and “on-the-go” mobile version

 

Types of Modalities

Each care specialty has a dedicated modality tailored to its exact needs. The content in these modalities are guided by the experts in their field, where steering boards contribute content and guide development, meeting the real-world specialty needs. Here is a breakdown of the major modules that Epic has released, along with the clinical areas where they are used:

ASAP ER Module

ASAP is the Epic module that deals with managing ER visits. It has a component that tracks which rooms are occupied, displaying room and bed status on monitors that are mounted on the walls near the nursing stations.

EpicCare Ambulatory

EpicCare Ambulatory is one of the main and largest components of the Epic System. Primary Care and Specialty clinicians use the Ambulatory Module to document visits, place orders, send prescriptions, perform in-office procedures, review results, and send communications to patients.

Epic Beacon Oncology

Beacon Oncology is the chemotherapy module in the Epic system. It is built around treatment plans for patients who are undergoing cancer treatment. Whereas most patient visits are either Outpatient or Inpatient, these visits are considered Series Visit Types, which span a longer amount of time.

Epic Beaker

Epic Beaker is the laboratory system for a hospital lab. Orders that are placed either in other parts of Epic or in an external system are transmitted to Beaker via an HL7 Interface1 for processing. When patients arrive to have their blood drawn, the results are entered into Beaker, which then get transmitted back to the ordering doctor.

Epic Bridges

Epic Bridges1 is the module for installing, configuring and maintaining clinical interfaces to other systems. See the reference below to learn more about interfaces.

Epic Cadence

Cadence is the Epic scheduling module for Outpatient and Specialty clinics. Any time you have an appointment with your doctor, their scheduling staff will use Cadence to book your appointment, then check you in on arrival. The physicians and other staff are able to see the schedule for the whole clinic, or just for their own patients.

Epic Caboodle – aka Cogito Data Warehouse

This area of Epic refers to the data warehouse and analytical tools used to store and retrieve large amounts of clinical data. The data can be queried to provide all manner of reporting to support care decisions, manage costs, and identify trends2. Other data can be brought in from non-Epic systems, and then used along with Epic data to provide reporting results. Until mid-2016, the trade name for these tools was Cogito, from the Latin phrase ergo sum: “I think, therefore I am”. In mid-2016, Epic renamed it to “Cabooble”, ie Kit & Caboodle. Get it?

Epic Care Everywhere

Care Everywhere is the network by which patient records are shared between different Healthcare organizations that use Epic. If you receive care at an Epic hospital in say, New York for example, then move to another state or even another country, your new care providers can run a Care Everywhere query from their instance of Epic to pull in your records from your previous providers. Care Everywhere operates as a Health Information Exchange.

Epic Cupid

Epic Cupid is the module for Cardiology practices. There are special clinical tools focused on cardiology care. Epic can also integrate or interface with external EKG devices to bring the EKG readings into the medical record.

Epic Happy Together

Happy Together is Epic’s effort toward communicating clinical information across different systems, including competing vendors. This is done from the provider standpoint by communicating through Health Information Exchanges. Also, many patients use Epic’s patient portal MyChart at more than one Epic location, such as a primary care office from one organization, and a specialist from another. Happy Together enables patients to see their clinical data from multiple locations in one MyChart session.

EpicCare Home Health

This is the module used in a home health setting, in which visiting caregivers (Nurse, Nurse Aides, PT, OT, etc) document care done in a patient’s home. Clinicians use a remotely installed software program that allows them to document in settings where they might not have any Internet connection. Then after they finish their work, they can reconnect to their organization’s network and perform a sync that uploads their documentation to the main Epic servers.

Epic Hyperspace

Epic Hyperspace is not a clinical module in itself, but rather the actual application client that is presented to users of most areas of Epic. When a nurse, doctor, therapist, or administrative staff launch Epic, the front-end software that is presented to them is called Hyperspace. It is typically installed on hosted servers that are accessed by many workstations throughout an enterprise, rather than being installed on individual users’ PCs. Citrix commonly used to host Hyperspace.

Since it is a core component of the Epic system, upgrades almost always include an update of Hyperspace. Epic Hyperspace is configured to display different menus, tasks, and options to users depending on their specific roles. For example, a pharmacist will be presented with many medication-related options, while a family practice physician will be presented with options to document clinical visits, place orders, and perform other clinically relevant tasks.

EpicCare Inpatient

EpicCare Inpatient is much like EpicCare Ambulatory, except that the clinical tasks are done in the hospital on admitted patients.

Epic Haiku

Epic Haiku is an App for Android and Apple that allows doctors to access a limited version of EpicCare Ambulatory. They can see and respond to test results, access their schedule, and see other clinical data on their patients.

Epic Healthy Planet

Healthy Planet is Epic’s Population Management system to help organizations deliver better care for a given population of patients. It is a direct outcome of the Affordable Healthcare Act, which established voluntary entities called Accountable Care Organizations. An ACO is set up to pay providers not just for delivering services, but for the healthy outcome of the patients who are enrolled in the ACO. Healthy Planet provides a suite of reports, dashboards, and workflow tools that allow Care Managers to manage patient populations in and apart from ACOs.

Epic Kaleidoscope

Epic Kaleidoscope is the Ophthalmology (Eye Care) module for Epic. It allows Ophthalmologists and Optometrists to perform eye exams, document eye related procedures, and write contact lens and eyeglass prescriptions.

EpicCare Link

When a hospital or other healthcare enterprise installs Epic, they typically interact with community physicians who do not have Epic, many of which do not have any electronic medical record system. EpicCare Link allows those providers to be given access to a web-based portal, allowing them to have limited use of the EMR to view activity on their patients who have received care at the associated hospital. It is usually configured to provide read-only access, meaning the external provider cannot place orders or do other clinical activity.

Epic Lucy

Lucy is not exactly a module, but is a concept of allowing patients to download and print their medical record in a usable format. This is called a Continuity of Care Document (CCD), and is considered a form of a personal health record.

Epic MyChart

MyChart is the web-based system that allows patients to manage their medical care in many ways. They can view test results, past and future visits, orders, medications, and more. They can also request appointments with physicians and ask non-urgent medical questions. A supporting App for Android and Apple is also available. Also, a newer feature that is beginning to emerge is the ability to conduct video visits with physicians. More about patient portals.

MyChart Bedside

Where MyChart is focused mainly on the outpatient and specialty parts of the patient record, MyChart bedside is intended for use while a patient is admitted to the hospital. It provides online tools for tracking your progress toward discharge, and can be configured to provide patient education material.

Epic OpTime

Epic OpTime is the Operating Room/ Surgery module for Epic. It has components for Inpatient Surgery as well as Outpatient Day Surgery.

Epic Prelude (ADT Patient Registration)

ADT stands for Admission, Discharge, Transfer. ADT is a critical part of the entire organization’s system because this is where the key information and status of all patients is managed. The Prelude module covers the hospital registration and insurance functions.

Radar

Radar is the dashboard configuration that is shared across almost all other Epic modules. Dashboards support reports, graphs, performance measures, helpful links, and much more pertaining to each area. For example, an OB dashboard will have measures relating to C-Section rates and number of births.

Epic Radiant

Epic Radiant is the Radiology module for Epic. It provides documentation, film tracking, and viewing of Radiology images.

Epic Sonnet

Epic Sonnet is a trimmed-down version of the main clinical application that is aimed at smaller organizations that cannot afford or don’t need the full-featured version. Epic will offer Sonnet to organizations as a software service hosted at their campus data center in Verona, WI.

Reporting Workbench

This is Epic’s application-side reporting solution which allows IT analysts to create and manage reports on date from most parts of the system. Users work from templates to get data on patient lists, orders, appointments, diagnoses, and much more. In Reporting Workbench, users do not run SQL queries to the database, as the tool is visually oriented.

Epic Rover

Epic Rover is the module that uses mobile devices to allow Inpatient nursing staff to do review and documentation tasks. Some of the functions that Rover helps with are chart review, medication administration, flowsheet documentation, and recording patient photos. It is not intended to take the place of Epic Hyperspace, the standard client for accessing clinical functions.

Epic Stork

Epic Stork is the Obstetrics module for managing pregnancy episodes on the Outpatient side, and documenting deliveries in the hospital.

Epic Welcome Kiosk

The Welcome Kiosk is about the size and shape of a small ATM, and allows patients to check in for appointments, pay co-pay amounts, sign documents, and print receipts and other materials.

 

Source: https://learnhealthtech.com/epic-systems-modules/

 

ECSM – Miami, FL

Posted by Julia Foster on October 26, 2016 in General

ECSM Positions Available
Miami, FL
Apply Now!

Excite Health Partners is seeking experienced ECSM to join our team.  We look forward to providing you with the ultimate experience in HIT staffing!

Excite Health Partners is a quality-driven, growth-oriented health information technology recruiting company specifically focused on the electronic medical records (EMR) niche market.  Excite is committed to meeting the needs of both our customers and our employees by providing unparalleled service and creating long-lasting relationships emphasizing honesty and responsiveness.  We strive to help our employees not only find success in their field, but also build careers highlighting their interests and talent.

Job Description:
The Epic Security Systems Analyst’s role is to successfully implement the application including design, building, and testing.

Responsibilities include:

  • Design  and testing security templates
  • Assist with security strategies

Job Requirements:

  • 3-5 plus years experience with security architecture and concepts
  • 3-5 plus years experience in design and building
  • Bachelor’s Degree
  • Willingness to travel
  • Technical and functional knowledge
  • Ability to work in small groups under tight project deadlines
  • Strong leadership and project management skills with the ability to effectively present information to clinical and business leaders within the organization

Excite understands that employees are the cornerstone to our success and is proud to offer the following benefits:

  • Competitive compensation
  • Health, Vision, Dental plan
  • 401k plan with designated company match
  • Weekly pay
  • Direct deposit

Wireless and Single Phase UPS Replacement Contractor – Independence, OH

Posted by Amanda Harner on May 24, 2016 in General

Wireless and Single Phase UPS Replacement Contractor
Independence, OH
Apply Now!

Are you searching for exciting Uninterruptible Power Supply opportunities?  Excite Health Partners is looking for experienced Wireless and Single Phase UPS Replacement Contractors to join our dynamic team.

Interested in learning more?

Excite Health Partners is not your average H.I.T. recruiting company.  We separate ourselves from the competition by specifically focusing on the electronic medical records (EMR) niche market.  This approach allows us to bring you the positions you desire that are directly related to your background.  At Excite, we are quality-driven and growth-oriented.  Our employees are our priority and we strive to help them not only find success in their field, but also build careers highlighting their interests and talent.  Excite is dedicated to meeting the needs of both our customers and our employees by providing unparalleled service and creating long-lasting relationships emphasizing honesty and responsiveness.

Still interested?

Keep reading for more details about this position!

Job Description:

The Wireless and Single Phase UPS Replacement Contractor’s main role is to install the Uninterruptible Power Supply equipment.

At Excite, we value your unique background and want to be sure your experience matches the job.  For the Wireless and Single Phase UPS Replacement Contractor position, you should meet the following criteria:     

  • Must have Tech Competence.
  • Must have knowledge of Uninterruptible Power Supply.
  • Must be able to lift at least 20 lbs.

Excite understands that employees are the cornerstone to our success and is proud to offer the following benefits:

  • Competitive compensation
  • Health, Vision, Dental plan
  • 401k plan with designated company match
  • Weekly pay
  • Direct deposit

At Excite, your goal s are our goals.  Apply today to join our team where our leaders will work with you to take your career to the next level!